PHSE FAQ's

Learning

What is PHSE?
 
Schools, in partnership with parents, have a vital role in preparing children and young people to negotiate the challenges and opportunities of an increasingly complex world. 
 
Personal, social, health and economic (PSHE) education is the school subject that deals with real life issues affecting our children, families and communities. It’s concerned with the social, health and economic realities of their lives, experiences and attitudes. It supports pupils to be healthy (mentally and physically); safe (online and offline) and equipped to thrive in their relationships and careers. 
 
PSHE education helps all children and young people — the highest achievers as well as the vulnerable and excluded — to achieve their fullest potential.
Why is PHSE so important?
 

PSHE education:

  • Contributes to physical and mental health and wellbeing, encouraging individual responsibility for health.
  • Contributes to the safety and protection of our children and young people, from staying safe online to understanding risks associated with drugs and alcohol.
  • Promotes independence, resilience and responsibility — preparing children and young people for future roles as parents, employees and leaders.
  • Supports employability by developing the personal and social skills demanded by commerce and industry.
  • Supports pupils to be critical consumers of information, and develops the skills to identify misleading news or views on social media and elsewhere.

What do children gain from the PHSE curriculum?

In summary, PSHE education provides opportunities to learn about :

  • Relationships: including developing and maintaining positive relationships and dealing with negative relationships. This may include learning about bullying, consent, how to communicate effectively, inappropriate behaviour in relationships and, at a later stage, topics such as sexual coercion and grooming.
  • Developing independence, resilience and responsibility: including preparing children and young people to face life’s challenges and make the most of life’s opportunities.
  • Health: including healthy lifestyles, healthy eating and exercise; mental and emotional health;  emergency life-saving skills at at a later stage, drug, alcohol and tobacco education.
  • Managing risk: including understanding personal safety and online safety; financial choices and risks; appreciating the value of taking risks in certain situations.

 

 

 

How can I support my child's PHSE education?
 

The personal, social, health and economic development of our children is achieved through partnership between school and the family. To support your children, you could:

  • Go to information events for parents about the school’s approach to PSHE related issues such as online safety, relationships and sex education and drugs.
  • Talk with your children about the issues explored in PSHE education.

If you have any concerns about PSHE education or are worried about your child, do speak to their teacher.